Roar Back


About two weeks ago I posted Teenager with Brain Cancer “Roars” about Olivia Wise, a teenager battling brain cancer, who came into a recording studio for her first time and recorded the Katy Perry song Roar even though couldn’t walk or stand.  Now Katy Perry has recorded a video message.

In her message, Katy tells Olivia that she was moved by the video and thought it sounded great and that she was sending love and light.  She also encourages Olivia to “keep roaring.”  What a wonderful response to Olivia’s recording!

Katy’s response is important on several different levels.  It establishes a bond between Katy and Olivia and had to thrill Olivia.  It takes brain tumor awareness to a new level; involvement of celebrities, no matter how fleeting, moves mountains in increasing brain tumor awareness.  It shows the sweet, caring side of a big time musical artist.

I for one applaud Katy Perry’s gesture and hope that she does more, both for Olivia and for brain tumor awareness.

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#BrainTumorThursday Eve


On the eve of the final #BrainTumorThursday campaign for the month of October (which is a rare 5th Thursday), it is interesting to see where the campaign currently stands for the entire month.

Total impacts for the month are currently about 224 M or more.  Total participants for the month currently number about 8,800 or more.  Total tweet for the month are currently about 14,400 or more.  Of course, these numbers are subject to the usual caveats found in prior posts.

The current total in October already exceeds the combined total of the months of June, July, August, and September.  The burning question is how high can we go for the month. The month of October needs to be completed strongly.  Consistent strong week over week and month over month campaigns is vital to make a difference.  I know that I long to make a different and I hope you do.  Let’s take it to the limit one more time.

Trending topics – are they relevant?


On a number of occasions, I have stated that I want to see #BrainTumorThursday trend on Twitter,  Toward that end, I have been trying to understand how topics trend and then thinking about how to apply that understanding to  #BrainTumorThursday.  Unfortunately, I have hit what I view to be a major roadblock.

Before I started this project, I was not aware that the coverage of the trend box can be changed by clicking “change” in the Trends box.  For example, the trends displayed can be for specific locations, from worldwide to country specific to city specific.  Your selection of the coverage area for the trends displayed can make drastic differences in what you see.  For example, looking at trends when writing this post, the trends for the UK were virtually identical, with Halloween and London topping the trending list for both.  In contrast, the top topic in the US was #blessed and Halloween was completely missing from the list.  The worldwide list was wildly different, essentially reflecting no overlap with the the trending list for the UK and the US.  Moreover, the passage of 10 minutes can render a list completely; in this case, Halloween, which was previously missing from the US list, became #1, while the former top topic dropped to #4.  There are other ways to customize the trends box and Twitter has published FAQs about Trends on Twitter, which provides more information.

Image

Therein lies the fundamental issue.  In theory, #BrainTumorThursday could trend in Australia, but nowhere else.  Or, it could trend in a smaller city in the UK, but not in the UK itself.  Then, even if it were to trend somewhere, it could be easily be missed due to rapid changes in trending lists.

My conclusion of all this is that, even if we were to employ strategies to get #BrainTumorThursday, it might only be in one area and we may never know that it happened.  In short, the logical conclusion and answer to the question posed in the title to this post is: Whether a topic becomes trending or not is irrelevant.  This means that my “dream” is unrealistic and would have meant little had it been accomplished.  Time to find another dream for #BrainTumorThursday..

Fourth #BrainTumorThursday campaign in October


The fourth #BrainTumorThursday campaign in October was again stellar. The numbers  for this week: Impacts (deliveries to people’s timelines): about 48.7 M+; Participants: about 825; and Tweets: about 1,825.  This brings the three week total to: Impacts of about 172.2 M+; Participants numbering about 4,075; and about 6,225.tweets.  Needless to to say, the #BrainTumorThursday twitter campaign for October is set to smash through the current monthly record.  Through just three weeks the October campaign has already exceeded every tracked category.

A few notes about the statistics listed above:

  1. All the totals are listed as approximate due to problems with the feed from Twitter to third party apps.  There are gaps in the feed.  Sometimes there is an hour or two gap in the feed and sometimes accounts with high follower counts are omitted.  Thus, the numbers reported by all third party apps are typically low.
  2. With respect to the total number of participants over two or more campaigns, there is no reliable way that I know of to delete duplication.  In other words, @melee_me tweets in every weekly campaign, but included in the participate number for each campaign.  This means that she is included twice in the cumulative totals over the first two campaigns.
  3. With respect to impacts, it should be understood that the figures do not indicate unique impacts on unique timeline.  An example is that if I tweet something and @melee_me retweets it, and we have a common follower, the tweet will show up in that follower’s timeline twice but two impacts for the same tweet will be recorded.  How to interpret this is beyond me and it may make no real difference at all so long as the message is getting out there.  However, it could be the case that we may not have a true measure of the success of the campaigns over time.  Nevertheless, the week over week, month over month increases do carry meaning and are significant.

Final estimates for the month of October will be made after the end of the month, but there are two thing to keep in mind.  First, there is a fifth Thursday in October so there is more to come.  Second, numbers at the end of the month are always higher than the combination of the numbers for each weekly campaign.  This is a result of the fact that #BrainTumorThursday continue throughout the week and those tweets will be captured in the estimate for the entire month.  Taking this all into consideration, it is pretty much a lock that October will generate 200 million timeline deliveries and possibly 250 million!

Thank you to the many people who make all these successes possible.  The #BrainTumorThursday team is incredible.

Third #BrainTumorThursday campaign in October


The third #BrainTumorThursday campaign in October was again stellar. The numbers  for this week: Impacts (deliveries to people’s timelines): about 52 M+; Participants: about 1,100; and Tweets: about 2,300.  This brings the three week total to: Impacts of about 123.5 M+; Participants numbering about 3,250; and about 4,450.tweets.  Needless to to say, the #BrainTumorThursday twitter campaign for October is set to smash through the current monthly record.  Through just three weeks the October campaign has already exceeded every tracked category.

A few notes about the statistics listed above:

  1. All the totals are listed as approximate due to problems with the feed from Twitter to third party apps.  There are gaps in the feed.  Sometimes there is an hour or two gap in the feed and sometimes accounts with high follower counts are omitted.  Thus, the numbers reported by all third party apps are typically low.
  2. With respect to the total number of participants over two or more campaigns, there is no reliable way that I know of to delete duplication.  In other words, @melee_me tweets in every weekly campaign, but included in the participate number for each campaign.  This means that she is included twice in the cumulative totals over the first two campaigns.
  3. With respect to impacts, it should be understood that the figures do not indicate unique impacts on unique timeli.  An example is that if I tweet something and @melee_me retweets it, and we have a common follower, the tweet will show up in that follower’s timeline twice but two impacts for the same tweet will be recorded.  How to interpret this is beyond me and it may make no real difference at all so long as the message is getting out there.  However, it could be the case that we may not have a true measure of the success of the campaigns over time.  Neverthelss, the week over week, month over month increases do carry meaning and are significant.

Finally, there are so many people to thank for this weeks effort, they cannot possibly all be listed.  However, around 20% are shown below.

10.17

Teenager with Brain Cancer “Roars”

Video


Olivia Wise is a courageous teenager who has brain cancer and recorded a cover of Katy Perry. It is nearly impossible to watch this video and not be deeply moved.  While I could write the back story for this, existing content does a much better job.

First, this is what the YouTube description says:

“Olivia Wise has Brain Cancer. She came into a recording studio for her first time and recorded the Katy Perry song Roar. She couldn’t walk or stand, she didn’t have her full breath or the energy she used to, and she was managing her new pains and new limitations. While her physical condition was rapidly fading, her spirit remained untouched.

Olivia is a fighter and has gone through the fire, in fact, she was going through the fire while she recorded this song, but you wouldn’t know it, because she was dancing right through it. She is an inspiration, a champion, and my hero. This is her Roar.”

Here is my paraphrase of what The Huffington Post writes:

There have been no shortages of awesome “Roar” covers. But this rendition of the popular Katy Perry hit is special. Olivia Wise, a teen with brain cancer, recently visited a studio for the first time to record her own version of the upbeat anthem — even though she wasn’t feeling so great herself. With just a piano in the background, Olivia Wise, a teen with brain cancer, slowed the song down to record her own version of the upbeat anthem and created a delicate, yet powerful ballad.

One Thing Leads to Another


This may be the perfect follow-up to yesterday’s post, “What’s Good About a Brain Tumor?” that explored the idea of being thankful to God in all circumstances.

After completing a 4,164-mile cross-country bicycle ride this summer, David Freeze developed blood clots.  Upon their discover, testing and treatment began.  As a final test, the doctor ordered an MRI of the brain.  That MRI revealed a brain tumor.  The bike ride finished on August 8, 2013 and the tumor was discovered on October 4, 2013.

No course of action has been decided yet, but David says: “Remember, I can still outrun every one of you. I’m going to catch you and make you smile. This is a time for lots of smiles.”

Read more.